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Age Related Macular Degeneration ( ARMD without CNVM )

Age Related Macular Degeneration ( ARMD without CNVM )

Age Related Macular Degeneration ( ARMD without CNVM )

By Dr.Ameen Marashi

This 73 years old patient suffers from reduced central vision
Your Diagnosis and Approach?

Age Related Macular Degeneration ( ARMD without CNVM )

Age Related Macular Degeneration ( ARMD without CNVM )

By Dr.Farhan Bashir Balroo ARMD without CNVM ( no leak on FFA)

 

 

Macular degeneration, often age-related macular degeneration (AMD or ARMD), is a medical condition that usually affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the macula) because of damage to the retina. It occurs in “dry” and “wet” forms. It is a major cause of blindness and visual impairment in older adults (>50 years), afflicting 30-50 million people globally. Macular degeneration can make it difficult or impossible to read or recognize faces, although enough peripheral vision remains to allow other activities of daily life.

Although some macular dystrophies affecting younger individuals are sometimes rarely referred to as macular degeneration, the term generally refers to age-related macular degeneration (AMD or ARMD).

The retina is a network of visual receptors and nerves. It lies on the choroid, a network of blood vessels that supply the retina with blood.

In the dry (nonexudative) form, cellular debris called drusen accumulates between the retina and the choroid, causing atrophy and scarring to the retina. In the wet (exudative) form, which is more severe, blood vessels grow up from the choroid behind the retina which can leak exudate and fluid and also cause hemorrhaging. It can be treated with laser coagulation, and more commonly with medication that stops and sometimes reverses the growth of blood vessels.

Signs and symptoms of macular degeneration include:

  • Drusen
  • Pigmentary changes
  • Distorted vision in the form of metamorphopsia, in which a grid of straight lines appears wavy and parts of the grid may appear blank: Patients often first notice this when looking at things like miniblinds in their home or telephone poles while driving.
  • Exudative changes: hemorrhages in the eye, hard exudates, subretinal/sub-RPE/intraretinal fluid
  • Slow recovery of visual function after exposure to bright light (photostress test)
  • Atrophy: incipient and geographic
  • Visual acuity drastically decreasing (two levels or more), e.g.: 20/20 to 20/80
  • Preferential hyperacuity perimetry changes (for wet AMD)
  • Blurred vision: Those with nonexudative macular degeneration may be asymptomatic or notice a gradual loss of central vision, whereas those with exudative macular degeneration often notice a rapid onset of vision loss (often caused by leakage and bleeding of abnormal blood vessels).
  • Central scotomas (shadows or missing areas of vision)
  • Trouble discerning colors, specifically dark ones from dark ones and light ones from light ones
  • A loss in contrast sensitivity
  • Straight lines appear curved in an Amsler grid

Macular degeneration by itself will not lead to total blindness. For that matter, only a very small number of people with visual impairment are totally blind. In almost all cases, some vision remains, mainly peripheral. Other complicating conditions may possibly lead to such an acute condition (severe stroke or trauma, untreated glaucoma, etc.), but few macular degeneration patients experience total visual loss.The area of the macula comprises only about 2.1% of the retina, and the remaining 97.9% (the peripheral field) remains unaffected by the disease. Interestingly, even though the macula provides such a small fraction of the visual field, almost half of the visual cortex is devoted to processing macular information.

The loss of central vision profoundly affects visual functioning. It is quite difficult, for example, to read without central vision. Pictures that attempt to depict the central visual loss of macular degeneration with a black spot do not really do justice to the devastating nature of the visual loss. This can be demonstrated by printing letters six inches high on a piece of paper and attempting to identify them while looking straight ahead and holding the paper slightly to the side. Most people find this difficult to do.

There is a loss of contrast sensitivity, so that contours, shadows, and color vision are less vivid. The loss in contrast sensitivity can be quickly and easily measured by a contrast sensitivity test performed either at home or by an eye specialist.

Similar symptoms with a very different etiology and different treatment can be caused by epiretinal membrane or macular pucker or any other condition affecting the macula, such as central serous retinopathy.

Age Related Macular Degeneration ( ARMD without CNVM )

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Age Related Macular Degeneration ( ARMD without CNVM ) By Dr.Ameen Marashi‎ This 73 years old patient suffers from reduced central vision Your Diagnosis and Approach? By Dr.Farhan Bashir Balroo ARMD without CNVM ( no leak on FFA)     Macular degeneration, often age-related macular degeneration (AMD or ARMD), is a medical condition that usually …

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